Friday, August 8, 2014

Obama’s Monsters Ball



  • Leaders were invited to the White House for the first ever US Africa summit
  • Included were dictators and despots with shocking human rights records
  • Obama's speech barely acknowledged the oppression rife across Africa


  • President Barack Obama drew a diplomatic line at the first ever U.S-Africa summit at the White House this week by not inviting Zimbabwe’s brutal dictator Robert Mugabe.
    But the guest list still included several other African leaders with only slightly better human rights records.

    The White House promoted the summit as the largest-ever gathering of African leaders in the United States, with more than 50 countries represented.


    DINNER IS SERVED

    The red carpet was rolled out for Equatorial Guinea's Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, who shot or jailed virtually all his political opponents, Gambia’s Yahya Jammeh, who threatened to ‘cut off the head’ of any homosexuals in the country and for Cameroon’s Paul Biya, who has the dubious honor of ranking 19th on author David Wallechinsky's 2006 list of the world's 20 worst living dictators.

    Many of the leaders were later photographed in the White House, posing for individual portraits with Obama and the First Lady.



    The President's opening speech avoided the prickly issues of homophobia and torture and instead sought out similarities between the two continents.

    He opened with: ‘I stand before you as the president of the United States, a proud American. I also stand before you as the son of a man from Africa’.

    Before going on to say: ‘Our faith traditions remind us of the inherent dignity of every human being and that our work as nations must be rooted in empathy and compassion for each other, as brothers and as sisters.’

    Here we run the rule over nine of the most controversial leaders who enjoyed the lavish affair....LINK


    DOO WAKKA DOO...WAKKA DOO...DIDDY WOP DIDDY WOP



    Read more: Daily Mail 



    OBAMA:  We've gotta let the science guide us and, you know, I don't think all the information's in on whether this drug is helpful.  What we do know is that the Ebola virus, both currently and in the past, is controllable if you have a strong public health infrastructure in place.  And the countries that have been affected are the first to admit that what's happened here is that their public health systems have been overwhelmed.  We're focusing on the public health approach right now because we know how to do that, but I will continue to seek information about what we're learning with respect to these drugs going forward.





    What he's trying to say is, "And the countries that have been hardest hit are the first to admit they don't even want it. They don't even have the infrastructure to know what to do with it," and I'm telling you, those countries would take that serum today, if it were offered. 


    More From Rush Limbaugh




    The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in DC had its moments, but perhaps none was more idiotic than John Kerry’s “contribution” to ending starvation and malnutrition in Africa.
    Kerry said Africa’s leaders need to to halt the development of new farmland if they’re going to combat the global warming that will, according to Lurch, worsen the hunger problem.
    During the Africa Summit “Resilience and Food Security in a Changing Climate” panel, Secretary of State John Kerry told an audience that “8,000 children die every day” and in sub-Sahara Africa, one in four suffer from chronic hunger.
    Then a few minutes later, he stressed how creating new farms would cause too much carbon pollution so they need to discourage more farm land.
    Yeah, he really did say that 


    Instead of farming for food, the U.S. secretary of state suggested that Africa try the sturgeon caviar at Topper’s on Nantucket. “It’s exquisite” according to Kerry


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